Rihanna’s success a stepping stone for others

Rihanna’s success a stepping stone for others
I WRITE THIS LETTER in response to what I found was a very biased and distasteful letter in this section of your November 16 edition by Etta Best. It is also especially for writers in general who unjustly criticise and downplay the contribution and successful accomplishments of internationally acclaimed Barbadian singer Rihanna.

I’m a young Barbadian, under the age of 25. I have lived here all my life and must say that it didn’t surprise me in the least to read such verbiage; but at the same time I was still very disappointed to see how we as fellow Barbadians continue to blatantly bad-mouth and cry down each other, especially when we should be otherwise supportive.

It doesn’t take for one to be a Rihanna fan or even a show business personality enthusiast, to use your words, Ms Best, to support and appreciate what Rihanna has accomplished and continues to in so short a period of time and at the highest level.

Every time her face appears in a magazine or in any of the media for that matter, that is automatic marketing for Barbados that many people hardly know exist.

It is quite true that she may not be the first person to bring recognition to Barbados in the music arena, but I do believe that she is the first to make it at this highest level in the industry. Whether we may say that she is where she is now, through by no fault of her own or that she was just lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time, there is no denying that she is showing us that she can rub shoulders with the best.

I also find it to be a very fickle point to compare Rihanna to the likes of other singing entertainers and draw a comparison of their achievements, especially when the names called were persons that have been in the industry for at least a decade.

She hasn’t even rounded the three-year mark properly yet. So please gather sensible facts before putting such an argument. Even if one isn’t necessarily a fan or a supporter of her music, one doesn’t have to think too far outside the box to realise that Rihanna’s success encourages young people and those of all ages to pursue their dreams no matter the discouragement.

Remember just about three years and some ago, Robyn Fenty was probably just as ordinary as any other Bajan teenager, happy go lucky and enjoying life with just dreams on her side and then . . .well, I guess I need say no more.

It just shows that no matter where you’re from, it just takes enough luck and the right timing and placement for one to be given a chance, that’s all it really takes. Why don’t we realise that we’re as good as anyone else and stop being so small minded?

But even as Rihanna continues to do well, I pray that she remains grounded as much as possible and not get carried away to the point of no return; that she stays morally sound, decent and most of all remembering that there’s a bigger power always watching over and to give thanks for where she is today.

– JOSEPH VOLNEY

(Barbadoes national news)

Published in: on December 10, 2007 at 3:30 pm  Leave a Comment  
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The flip side of a canceled concer? {Maybe or maybe not}

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December 09, 2007. MediaTakeOut.com told you a few months ago that R&B singer Ciara would be the opening act for Rihanna’s European tour. It now appears that there may be trouble on the horizon for the two ladies.

That’s because according to one of MediaTakeOut.com’s most trusted insiders, the two ladies have been bitterly feuding about the details of the tour. And last night that feud caused Rihanna to cancel their concert in Nottingham, UK.

A person who works with the tour claims that Rihanna has been limiting the amount of rehearsal time that Ciara and her team were allowed. And that the Bajan beauty’s team hasn’t properly paid Ciara for her performances.

The insider explained to MediaTakeOut.com, “[Ciara’s camp] wasn’t about to sit back and let Rihanna’s people walk all over [them], so [they] stood up for Ciara … Next thing you know, the [Nottingham] concert’s cancelled. Maybe it’s all just a coincidence, but I don’t think so.” The insider continued, “[Ciara] was told not to show up to the arena to perform … that the concert was cancelled.”

And what about the thousands of fans who purchased tickets to see the two ladies perform live. Well they’ve been emailing MediaTakeOut.com is droves. Here’s a sample of one of the more angry emails from one of the fans:

i am a very upset Rihanna fan from the UK. She was supposed to be performing at the Nottingham arena today but the big foreheaded b*tch decided it would be a good idea to cancel the concert an hour before it started.

I was really upset because I traveled all the way from London just to see her. And London is very far from Nottingham and it costs a lot of money to get there. Not to mention that it was a very cold and rainy night and fans were stranded in the city centre. All because Rihanna could not be bothered 2 get off her arse and give us what we paid for.

She should at least let Ciara – her supporting act – perform because she would have been better than Rihanna anyway. Most of my friends were looking forward to seeing Ciara more than her anyway.

I was so disappointed I thought she had more sense in that big forehead. Clearly I was wrong!!!!!!

So far, MediaTakeOut.com is hearing that the rest of the concert dates are scheduled to take place according to plans. The next tour date in Monday night in Birmingham UK. We’ll let you know if anything changes.

Developing…
{MEDIATAKEOUT.COM}

Published in: on December 10, 2007 at 3:25 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Rihanna concert postponed

Rihanna concert postponed

Rihanna’s gig in Bournemouth has been postponed

Rihanna’s gig at the BIC in Bournemouth has been postponed on her doctor’s request, it has been announced.
The songstress also pulled out of Saturday’s Nottingham show and Monday’s gig at Birmingham’s NEC Arena.
All dates will be rescheduled and original tickets will be valid for the new date.
Rihanna’s promoter said in a statement: “As per Rihanna’s doctor’s instructions, Rihanna will be unable to perform in Bournemouth tomorrow night. Rihanna plans to reschedule this date as soon as possible.
“She appreciates the love and support of all her fans and wants nothing more than to see and connect with them. We apologise for any inconvenience.”
Rihanna began the tour in Paris last month and was due to end it on December 21 in Moscow, Russia.
The 19-year-old stayed at the top of the charts for 10 weeks earlier this year with her single Umbrella.

Mon 10 Dec

{virgin media uk}

Published in: on December 10, 2007 at 3:19 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Nominations hit Rihanna for six

Nominations hit Rihanna for six
“OH MY GOD, I can’t believe it. Six Grammy nominations?”

That was Rihanna‘s immediate reaction to Evan Rogers, the American composer, music producer and mentor who relayed the news from the United States that she had been nominated for Record Of The Year, Song Of The Year, Best Dance Recording, Best R&B Song, Best Rap/Song Collaboration and Best R&B Performance.

“I just can’t believe this is happening to me,” she told Rogers, who spotted Rihanna‘s talent three years ago while on a trip to Barbados with his Bajan wife Jackie, and encouraged her parents to allow the teenager to come to Connecticut to seek fame and fortune.

“I almost have to pinch myself to believe this is happening to me,” she said to Rogers from Manchester, England, where she was about to perform at
a sold out concert.

Rogers, who helped to guide Rihanna into the American music scene and remains a key force in her career, said the large number of nominations left Rihanna and everyone around her stunned and ecstatic.

“She feels the same way I feel and it is such an unbelievable thing,” he said. (TB)

{source:National news barbadoes}

Published in: on December 10, 2007 at 1:54 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Rihanna @ M.E.N. Arena

Byron Evans                          
7/12/2007

 

06/12/07

SEX sells and R&B is sexy. You don’t need to be a big brother psychologist to work out why this music genre is such a massive money making machine.

Over recent years some performers look and behave as though they’ve fallen straight off the top shelf in one of those specialist newsagents. What then of the younger soul loving youngsters, whose innocent ears need to be protected.

Cue R&B pop it’s light, fluffy, funky and as disposable as the early Tamela Motown singles.

Since the sad demise of Aaliyah the fight has been on to fill the vacant title of R&B pop queen as seen many try. Pretender to the throne or rightful air Rihanna has all the makings of musically royalty. She’s young, talented and hotter than a batch of your grannies favourite biscuits.

The arena is packed. A cacophony of flash bulbs and neon head bands were almost as hypnotic as the girl from Barbados’s outfits.

Rihanna tottered onto the stage accentuating her doll like features with a dress straight out of a fetish club. All that I said about wholesome family music, well it’s going out the window second by second.

From the floor to the top tier the audience is made up mainly of girls, under the age of 16 and predominantly white and they know every single lyric and every gyration.

Declared

The demure and yet raunchy songstress declared to the crowd that this was her biggest crowd in the UK, a unified scream resonated around the Arena at such a pitch dogs all over the region are bumping into each other totally disorientated.

S.O.S broke Rihanna this side of the pond an expertly crafted pop song that lended itself to remixes in the dance clubs and the cheesy loving slow driving head nodders.

Shut Up and Drive sustains the pre pubescent fervour. Stick a rock guitar on stage and you have a musical crossover. Well not quite but there was really on one track everyone had waited impatiently to hear Umbrella.

Ten weeks that single stayed at the top of the charts. The song was blamed for us not having a decent summer this year and whether we like it or not it’s going to be the kind of wedding song that Brian Adams song ‘Everything I do’ is for happy couples today.

It was the final track of the evening and as soon as the intro kicked in Umbrellas opened all over the Arena. Superstition was certainly not at the fore of these young fans minds.

Brollies were being twirled with such glee that the only down pour coming from the stage is the soulful sauce that Rihanna is selling and her fans are most definitely buying.

Published in: on December 7, 2007 at 3:31 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Rihanna at Radio One’s Live Lounge: Tells the “Umbrella” Story

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Yesterday, Rihanna was a guest at UK’s Radio One, for their Live Lounge series – an in-studio song session. Rihanna sang “Hate That I Love You” and “Umbrella.” You can listen to the session and interview on the BBC Radio site. I did a de-mix: cut out the songs and got to the chat. There was an awful cover song played; Rihanna talked about spending her Christmas in Barbados; and toward the end, Rihanna told the story of how Mary J. Blige almost stole the biggest hit of her career.

This is more entertaining with her Bajan accent, but here it goes..

“Dream, the guy who wrote the song, sent it in to Def Jam. We listened to it, we fell in love with it instantly. We were like, “We have to have this song.” We thought it was the most original song we heard in a long time. It kind of set a new trend for music. You know, it sounded different to everything else we were hearing at the time.

The moment we said we confirm, we want to record it now, they were like, “Well hold on, cause a lot of other people are listening to it.” A lot of artists who been around for much longer than I have. So I just give up. I was like, “You know what, there is no chance for me.” But two days, I was just listening to the demo, listening, listening. I was like, “I have to have this record.”

And I saw one of the guys at the Grammy awards, and I was like, “You know what? ‘Umbrella’ is MY song!” I was basically telling him if you don’t give it to me I’m gonna fight you. I was so confrontational and he was laughing or whatever. But we eventually fought, we got the song and here we are now.”

Do you know who you fought off? Who else was going for it?

“A few other people, Mary J. Blige, she was definitely the one I was like, ‘Ok, no way, she’s gonna get it.’ Umm, I think Britney Spears had a chance at it also. I think Akon too. Those are some of the names I heard.”

the last movie she saw was “Talk To Me.”

{SOURCE:http://www.whudat.com/newsblurbs/more/rihanna_at_radio_ones_live_lounge_tells_the_umbrella_story_1681206073/}

Copy link beloow to listen to interview live

Published in: on December 7, 2007 at 3:27 pm  Leave a Comment  
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EG INTERVIEW: RIHANNA

She came out of Barbabos under the influence of Alicia Keyes and Beyonce, signed to Def Jam, toured with Gwen Stefani, then produced the biggest hit of 2007, Umbrella, no doubt helped by the additional vocals supplied by hip-hop giant Jay-Z, who also wrote and produced the tune. It spent ten weeks at the top, matching Whitney Houston’s record for a female artist with I Will Always Love You in 1991. The single also helped her third album, Good Girl Gone Bad, go to No. 1.

What has been the highlight of this year?

Having the biggest song of the decade. I think that’s a huge title. To be up there with Whitney Houston is one of the biggest honours, so that’s the highlight.

Does being a famous singer meet expectations?

I didn’t really know what to expect. I was in Barbados so I was far away from seeing what this could be like. All I knew is that I love to sing and wanted to do this. Now I’m able to stick with it and put up with all the hard work because I love what I do so much.

You’ve worked with a lot of big names. Any favourites?

Justin Timberlake and Timbaland were definitely two of my favourites. Also The Dream — the singer-songwriter. Yes, he’s good. The energy in the studio was fantastic. Just being around such great people and great musicians and creative minds all in one room. We had a blast.

Your songs have sampled Soft Cell and New Order. Are you a fan of early 80s pop?

I wasn’t really very aware of them until I did the songs. I listen to more… let me see… you know what, my taste in music is very vast so it’s hard to say what type of music I like. I wasn’t a fan of New Order before because I didn’t know a lot of their music, but now I know more.

Where will you be for Christmas?

In Barbados. I think I stop work a couple of days before Christmas. Do I like being busy? Well, sometimes you get exhausted and you just want to rest. But it’s OK.

What are your hopes for the future?

I want to act, I want to set up some of my own businesses. But I also want to continue with music.

What kind of businesses are you thinking of?

Fashion lines and stuff like that.

What might surprise your fans to know about you?

Well, I like tattoos. I have four. One is a Sanskrit word, one is a star, one is a music note, on my foot and the other is a Pisces sign.

Published in: on December 7, 2007 at 3:24 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Complete list of nominees

1. Record of the Year: “Be Without You,” Mary J. Blige; “You’re Beautiful,” James Blunt; “Not Ready to Make Nice,” Dixie Chicks; “Crazy,” Gnarls Barkley; “Put Your Records On,” Corinne Bailey Rae.

2. Album of the Year: “Taking the Long Way,” Dixie Chicks; “St. Elsewhere,” Gnarls Barkley; “Continuum,” John Mayer; “Stadium Arcadium,” Red Hot Chili Peppers; “FutureSex/LoveSounds,” Justin Timberlake.

3. Song of the Year: “Be Without You,” Johnta Austin, Mary J. Blige, Bryan-Michael Cox and Jason Perry (Mary J. Blige); “Jesus, Take the Wheel,” Brett James, Hillary Lindsey and Gordie Sampson (Carrie Underwood); “Not Ready to Make Nice,” Martie Maguire, Natalie Maines, Emily Robison and Dan Wilson (Dixie Chicks); “Put Your Records On,” John Beck, Steve Chrisanthou and Corinne Bailey Rae (Corinne Bailey Rae); “You’re Beautiful,” James Blunt, Amanda Ghost and Sacha Skarbek (James Blunt).

4. New Artist: James Blunt; Chris Brown; Imogen Heap; Corinne Bailey Rae; Carrie Underwood.

5. Female Pop Vocal Performance: “Ain’t No Other Man,” Christina Aguilera; “Unwritten,” Natasha Bedingfield; “You Can Close Your Eyes,” Sheryl Crow; “Stupid Girls,” Pink; “Black Horse and the Cherry Tree,” KT Tunstall.

6. Male Pop Vocal Performance: “You’re Beautiful,” James Blunt; “Save Room,” John Legend; “Waiting on the World to Change,” John Mayer; “Jenny Wren,” Paul McCartney; “Bad Day,” Daniel Powter.

7. Pop Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocal: “My Humps,” the Black Eyed Peas; “I Will Follow You Into the Dark,” Death Cab for Cutie; “Over My Head (Cable Car),” the Fray; “Is It Any Wonder?,” Keane; “Stickwitu,” the Pussycat Dolls.

8. Pop Collaboration With Vocals: “For Once in My Life,” Tony Bennett and Stevie Wonder; “One,” Mary J. Blige and U2; “Always on Your Side,” Sheryl Crow and Sting; “Promiscuous,” Nelly Furtado and Timbaland; “Hips Don’t Lie,” Shakira and Wyclef Jean.

9. Pop Instrumental Performance: “Mornin’,” George Benson (& Al Jarreau); “Drifting,” Enya; “Subterfuge,” Bela Fleck and the Flecktones; “Song H,” Bruce Hornsby; “My Favorite Things,” the Brian Setzer Orchestra.

10. Pop Instrumental Album: “New Beginnings,” Gerald Albright; “Fire Wire,” Larry Carlton; “X,” Fourplay; “Fingerprints,” Peter Frampton; “Wrapped in a Dream,” Spyro Gyra.

11. Pop Vocal Album: “Back to Basics,” Christina Aguilera; “Back to Bedlam,” James Blunt; “The River in Reverse,” Elvis Costello and Allen Toussaint; “Continuum,” John Mayer; “FutureSex/LoveSounds,” Justin Timberlake.

12. Dance Recording: “Suffer Well,” Depeche Mode; “Ooh La La,” Goldfrapp; “Get Together,” Madonna; “I’m With Stupid,” Pet Shop Boys; “Sexy Back,” Justin Timberlake and Timbaland.

13. Electronic/Dance Album: “Supernature,” Goldfrapp; “Confessions on a Dance Floor,” Madonna; “A Lively Mind,” Oakenfold; “Fundamental,” Pet Shop Boys; “The Garden,” Zero 7.

14. Traditional Pop Vocal Album: “Duets: an American Classic,” Tony Bennett; “Caught in the Act,” Michael Buble; “Wintersong,” Sarah McLachlan; “Bette Midler Sings the Peggy Lee Songbook,” Bette Midler; “Timeless Love,” Smokey Robinson.

15. Solo Rock Vocal Performance: “Nausea,” Beck; “Someday Baby,” Bob Dylan; “Route 66,” John Mayer; “Saving Grace,” Tom Petty; “Lookin’ for a Leader,” Neil Young.

16. Rock Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocal: “Talk,” Coldplay; “How to Save a Life,” the Fray; “Steady, As She Goes,” the Raconteurs; “Dani California,” Red Hot Chili Peppers; “The Saints Are Coming,” U2 and Green Day.

17. Hard Rock Performance: “Crazy Bitch,” Buckcherry; “Every Day Is Exactly the Same,” Nine Inch Nails; “Lonely Day,” System of a Down; “Vicarious,” Tool; “Woman,” Wolfmother.

18. Metal Performance: “Redneck,” Lamb of God; “Colony of Birchmen,” Mastodon; “Lies, Lies, Lies,” Ministry; “Eyes of the Insane,” Slayer; “30/30-150,” Stone Sour.

19. Rock Instrumental Performance: “Chun Li’s Flying Bird Kick,” Arctic Monkeys; “The Wizard Turns On … ,” the Flaming Lips; “Black Hole Sun,” Peter Frampton; “Catsellorizon,” David Gilmour; “Super Colossal,” Joe Satriani.

20. Rock Song: “Chasing Cars,” Nathan Connolly, Gary Lightbody, Jonny Quinn, Tom Simpson and Paul Wilson (Snow Patrol); “Dani California,” Flea, John Frusciante, Anthony Kiedis and Chad Smith (Red Hot Chili Peppers); “Lookin’ for a Leader,” Neil Young (Neil Young); “Someday Baby,” Bob Dylan (Bob Dylan); “When You Were Young,” Brandon Flowers, Dave Keuning, Mark Stoermer and Ronnie Vannucci (The Killers).

21. Rock Album: “Try!,” John Mayer Trio; “Highway Companion,” Tom Petty; “Broken Boy Soldiers,” the Raconteurs; “Stadium Arcadium,” Red Hot Chili Peppers; “Living With War,” Neil Young.

22. Alternative Music Album: “Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not,” Arctic Monkeys; “At War With the Mystics,” the Flaming Lips; “St. Elsewhere,” Gnarls Barkley; “Show Your Bones,” Yeah Yeah Yeahs; “The Eraser,” Thom Yorke.

23. Female R&B Vocal Performance: “Ring the Alarm,” Beyonce; “Be Without You,” Mary J. Blige; “Don’t Forget About Us,” Mariah Carey; “Day Dreaming,” Natalie Cole; “I Am Not My Hair,” India.Arie.

24. Male R&B Vocal Performance: “Heaven,” John Legend; “So Sick,” Ne-Yo; “Black Sweat,” Prince; “I Call It Love,” Lionel Richie; “Got You Home,” Luther Vandross.

25. R&B Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocals: “Breezin’,” George Benson and Al Jarreau; “Love Changes,” Jamie Foxx featuring Mary J. Blige; “Everyday (Family Reunion),” Chaka Khan, Gerald Levert, Yolanda Adams and Carl Thomas; “Family Affair,” (Sly and the Family Stone), John Legend, Joss Stone With Van Hunt; “Beautiful, Loved and Blessed,” Prince and Tamar.

26. Traditional R&B Vocal Performance: “Christmas Time Is Here,” Anita Baker; “God Bless the Child,” George Benson and Al Jarreau featuring Jill Scott; “I Found My Everything,” Mary J. Blige featuring Raphael Saadiq; “You Are So Beautiful,” Sam Moore featuring Billy Preston, Zucchero, Eric Clapton and Robert Randolph; “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You),” the Temptations.

27. Urban/Alternative Performance: “Crazy,” Gnarls Barkley; “That Heat,” Segio Mendes featuring Erykah Badu and Will.i.am; “Mas Que Nada,” Sergio Mendes featuring the Black Eyed Peas; “Idlewild Blue (Don’t Chu Worry ‘Bout Me),” Outkast; “3121,” Prince.

28. R&B Song: “Be Without You,” Johnta Austin, Mary J. Blige, Bryan-Michael Cox and Jason Perry (Mary J. Blige); “Black Sweat,” Prince (Prince) Track from: 3121; “Deja Vu,” Shawn Carter, Rodney “Darkchild” Jerkins, Beyonce Knowles, Makeba, Keli Nicole Price and Delisha Thomas, songwriters (Beyonce featuring Jay-Z); “Don’t Forget About Us,” Johnta Austin, Mariah Carey, Bryan-Michael Cox and Jermaine Dupri (Mariah Carey); “I Am Not My Hair,” Drew Ramsey, Shannon Sanders and India Arie Simpson (India.Arie) Track from: Testimony: Vol. 1, Life and Relationship.

29. R&B Album: “The Breakthrough,” Mary J. Blige; “Unpredictable,” Jamie Foxx; “Testimony: Vol. 1, Life and Relationship,” India.Arie; “3121,” Prince; “Coming Home,” Lionel Richie.

30. Contemporary R&B Album: “B’Day,” Beyonce; “Chris Brown,” Chris Brown; “20 Y.O.,” Janet Jackson; “Kelis Was Here,” Kelis; “In My Own Words,” Ne-Yo.

31. Rap Solo Performance: “Touch It,” Busta Rhymes; “We Run This,” Missy Elliott; “Kick, Push,” Lupe Fiasco; “Undeniable,” Mos Def; “What You Know,” T.I..

32. Rap Performance by a Duo or Group: “Ridin,” Chamillionaire featuring Krayzie Bone; “Georgia,” Ludacris and Field Mob (featuring Jamie Foxx); “Grillz,” Nelly featuring Paul Wall, Ali and Gipp; “Mighty ‘O’,” Outkast; “Don’t Feel Right,” the Roots.

33. Rap/Sung Collaboration: “Smack That,” Akon featuring Eminem; “Deja Vu,” Beyonce featuring Jay-Z; “Shake That,” Eminem featuring Nate Dogg; “Unpredictable,” Jamie Foxx featuring Ludacris; “My Love,” Justin Timberlake featuring T.I..

34. Rap Song: “It’s Goin’ Down,” Chadron Moore and Jasiel Robinson (Yung Joc); “Kick, Push,” Wasalu Muhammad Jaco (Lupe Fiasco); “Money Maker,” Christopher Bridges and Pharrell Williams (Ludacris featuring; “Ridin,” Anthony Henderson, J. Slainas, O. Salinas and Hakeem Seriki; “What You Know,” (Donny Hathaway, Leroy Hutson and Curtis.

35. Rap Album: “Lupe Fiasco’s Food and Liquor,” Lupe Fiasco; “Release Therapy,” Ludacris; “In My Mind,” Pharrell; “Game Theory,” the Roots; “King,” T.I..

36. Female Country Vocal Performance: “Kerosene,” Miranda Lambert; “I Still Miss Someone,” Martina McBride; “Something’s Gotta Give,” LeAnn Rimes; “Jesus, Take the Wheel,” Carrie Underwood; “I Don’t Feel Like Loving You Today,” Gretchen Wilson.

37. Male Country Vocal Performance: “Every Mile a Memory,” Dierks Bentley; “The Reason Why,” Vince Gill; “The Seashores of Old Mexico,” George Strait; “Would You Go With Me,” Josh Turner; “Once in a Lifetime,” Keith Urban.

38. Country Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocal: “Not Ready to Make Nice,” Dixie Chicks; “Heaven’s My Home,” the Duhks; “Boondocks,” Little Big Town; “What Hurts the Most,” Rascal Flatts; “Leave the Pieces,” the Wreckers.

39. Country Collaboration With Vocals: “Who Says You Can’t Go Home,” Bon Jovi and Jennifer Nettles; “Tomorrow Is Forever,” Solomon Burke and Dolly Parton; “Calling Me,” Kenny Rogers and Don Henley; “Midnight Angel,” Rhonda Vincent and Bobby Osborne; “Love Will Always Win,” Trisha Yearwood and Garth Brooks.

40. Country Instrumental Performance: “Jerusalem Ridge,” Casey Driessen; “Gameshow Rag/Cannonball Rag,” Tommy Emmanuel; “Whiskey Before Breakfast,” Bryan Sutton and Doc Watson; “The Eleventh Reel,” Chris Thile; “Nature of the Beast,” Jim VanCleve.

41. Country Song: “Every Mile a Memory,” Brett Beavers, Dierks Bentley and Steve Bogard (Dierks Bentley); “I Don’t Feel Like Loving You Today,” Matraca Berg and Jim Collins (Gretchen Wilson); “Jesus, Take the Wheel,” Brett James, Hillary Lindsey and Gordie Sampson (Carrie Underwood); “Like Red on a Rose,” Melanie Castleman and Robert Lee Castleman (Alan Jackson); “What Hurts the Most,” Steve Robson and Jeffrey Steele (Rascal Flatts).

42. Country Album: “Taking the Long Way,” Dixie Chicks; “Like Red on a Rose,” Alan Jackson; “The Road to Here,” Little Big Town; “You Don’t Know Me: the Songs of Cindy Walker,” Willie Nelson; “Your Man,” Josh Turner.

43. Bluegrass Album: “Long List of Heartaches,” the Grascals; “Bluegrass,” Jim Lauderdale; “Instrumentals,” Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder; “Live at the Ryman,” Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives; “All American Bluegrass Girl,” Rhonda Vincent.

44. New Age Album: “A Posteriori,” Enigma; “Amarantine,” Enya; “Beyond Words,” Gentle Thunder With Will Clipman and AmoChip Dabney; “Elements Series: Fire,” Peter Kater; “The Magical Journeys of Andreas Vollenweider,” Andreas Vollenweider.

45. Contemporary Jazz Album: “The Hidden Land,” Bela Fleck and the Flecktones; “People People Music Music,” Groove Collective; “Rewind That,” Christian Scott; “Sexotica,” Sex Mob; “Who Let the Cats Out?,” Mike Stern.

46. Jazz Vocal Album: “Footprints,” Karrin Allyson; “Easy to Love,” Roberta Gambarini; “Live at Jazz Standard With Fred Hersch,” Nancy King; “From This Moment On,” Diana Krall; “Turned to Blue,” Nancy Wilson.

47. Jazz Instrumental Solo: “Some Skunk Funk,” Michael Brecker; “Paq Man,” Paquito D’Rivera; “Freedom Jazz Dance,” Taylor Eigsti; “Hippidy Hop (Drum Solo),” Roy Haynes; “Hope,” Branford Marsalis.

48. Jazz Instrumental Album, Individual or Group: “Sound Grammar,” Ornette Coleman; “The Ultimate Adventure,” Chick Corea; “Trio Beyond — Saudades,” Jack DeJohnette, Larry Goldings and John Scofield; “Beyond the Wall,” Kenny Garrett; “Sonny, Please,” Sonny Rollins.

49. Large Jazz Ensemble Album: “Some Skunk Funk,” Randy Brecker With Michael Brecker, Jim Beard, Will Lee, Peter Erskine, Marcio; “Spirit Music,” Bob Brookmeyer – New Art Orchestra; “Streams of Expression,” Joe Lovano Ensemble; “Live in Tokyo at the Blue Note,” Mingus Big Band; “Up From the Skies — Music of Jim McNeely,” the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra.

50. Latin Jazz Album: “Codes,” Ignacio Berroa; “Cubist Music,” Edsel Gomez; “Simpatico,” the Brian Lynch/Eddie Palmieri Project; “Absolute Quintet,” Dafnis Prieto; “Viva,” Diego Urcola, Edward Simon, Avishai Cohen, Antonio Sanchez and Pernell Saturnino.

51. Gospel Performance: “Victory,” Yolanda Adams; “Not Forgotten,” Israel and New Breed; “The Blessing of Abraham,” Donald Lawrence and the Tri-City Singers; “Made to Worship,” Chris Tomlin; “Victory,” Tye Tribbett and G.A..

52. Gospel Song: “The Blessing of Abraham,” Donald Lawrence (Donald Lawrence and the Tri-City Singers); “Imagine Me,” Kirk Franklin (Kirk Franklin); “Mountain of God,” Brown Bannister and Mac Powell (Third Day); “Not Forgotten,” Israel Houghton and Aaron Lindsey (Israel and New Breed); “Victory,” Tye Tribbett (Tye Tribbett and G.A.).

53. Rock or Rap Gospel Album: “DecembeRadio,” DecembeRadio; “Where the Past Meets Today,” Sarah Kelly; “Turn Around,” Jonny Lang; “End of Silence,” Red; “Bone-A-Fide,” T-Bone.

54. Pop/Contemporary Gospel Album: “Sound of Melodies,” Leeland; “Coming Up to Breathe,” MercyMe; “Wherever You Are,” Third Day; “See the Morning,” Chris Tomlin; “Introducing Ayiesha Woods,” Ayiesha Woods.

55. Southern, Country, or Bluegrass Gospel Album: “Kenny Bishop,” Kenny Bishop; “Give It Away,” Gaither Vocal Band; “Precious Memories,” Alan Jackson; “The Promised Land,” the Del McCoury Band; “Glory Train,” Randy Travis.

56. Traditional Gospel Album: “An Invitation to Worship,” Byron Cage; “Paved the Way,” the Caravans; “Still Keeping It Real,” the Dixie Hummingbirds; “Alive in South Africa,” Israel and New Breed; “Finale Act One,” Donald Lawrence and the Tri-City Singers.

57. Contemporary R&B Gospel Album: “Set Me Free,” Myron Butler and Levi; “Hero,” Kirk Franklin; “A Timeless Christmas,” Israel and New Breed; “This Is Me,” Kierra Kiki Sheard; “Victory Live!,” Tye Tribbett and G.A..

58. Latin Pop Album: “Adentro,” Arjona; “Lo Que Trajo El Barco,” Obie Bermodez; “Individual,” Fulano; “Trozos De Mi Alma 2,” Marco Antonio Solis; “Limon Y Sal,” Julieta Venegas.

59. Latin Rock, Alternative or Urban Album: “Lo Demas Es Plastico,” Black:Guayaba; “The Underdog/El Subestimado,” Tego Calderon; “Calle 13,” Calle 13; “Superpop Venezuela,” Los Amigos Invisibles; “Amar Es Combatir,” Mana.

60. Tropical Latin Album: “Fuzionando,” Oscar D’Leon; “Salsaton: Salsa Con Reggaeton,” Andy Montanez; “Hoy, Manana Y Siempre,” Tito Nieves; “Directo Al Corazon,” Gilberto Santa Rosa; “What You’ve Been Waiting for — Lo Que Esperabas,” Tiempo Libre.

61. Mexican/Mexican-American Album: “Historias De Mi Tierra,” Pepe Aguilar; “No Es Brujeria,” Ana Barbara; “25 Aniversario,” Mariachi Sol De Mexico De Jose Hernandez; “A Toda Ley,” Pablo Montero; “Orgullo De Mujer,” Alicia Villarreal.

62. Tejano Album: “Sigue El Taconazo,” Chente Barrera; “It’s … All Right,” Jimmy Edward; “Live in Session,” Bob Gallarza; “All of Me,” Jay Perez; “Rebecca Valadez,” Rebecca Valadez.

63. Norteno Album: “Algo De Mi,” Conjunto Primavera; “Puro Pa’ Arriba,” Los Huracanes Del Norte; “Historias Que Contar,” Los Tigres Del Norte; “Piensame Un Momento,” Pesado; “Prefiero La Soledad,” Retono.

64. Banda Album: “20 Mil Heridas,” Banda Machos; “Mas Fuerte Que Nunca,” Banda El Recodo de Cruz Lizarraga; “Amor Gitano,” Cuisillos; “A Mucha Honra,” Ezequiel Pena; “Mas Alla Del Sol,” Joan Sebastian.

65. Traditional Blues Album: “Brother to the Blues,” Tab Benoit With Louisiana’s Leroux; “Bronx in Blue,” Dion; “People Gonna Talk,” James Hunter; “Guitar Groove-A-Rama,” Duke Robillard; “Risin’ With the Blues,” Ike Turner.

66. Contemporary Blues Album: “Live From Across the Pond,” Robert Cray Band; “Sippiana Hericane,” Dr. John and the Lower 911; “Suitcase,” Keb’ Mo’; “Hope and Desire,” Susan Tedeschi; “After the Rain,” Irma Thomas.

67. Traditional Folk Album: “I Stand Alone,” Ramblin’ Jack Elliott; “Gonna Let It Shine,” Odetta; “Adieu False Heart,” Linda Ronstadt and Ann Savoy; “We Shall Overcome — the Seeger Sessions,” Bruce Springsteen; “A Distant Land to Roam,” Ralph Stanley.

68. Contemporary Folk/Americana Album: “Solo Acoustic Vol. 1,” Jackson Browne; “Black Cadillac,” Rosanne Cash; “Workbench Songs,” Guy Clark; “Modern Times,” Bob Dylan; “All the Roadrunning,” Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris.

69. Native American Music Album: “Voice of the Drum,” Black Eagle; “Heart of the Wind,” Robert Tree Cody and Will Clipman; “American Indian Story,” Jana; “Long Winter Nights,” Northern Cree and Friends; “Dance With the Wind,” Mary Youngblood.

70. Hawaiian Music Album: “Generation Hawai’i,” Amy Hanaiali’i; “Grandmaster Slack Key Guitar,” Ledward Ka’apana; “The Wild Hawaiian,” Henry Kapono; “Hawaiian Slack Key Kings,” Various Artists; “Legends of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar — Live From Maui,” Various Artists.

71. Reggae Album: “Too Bad,” Buju Banton; “Love Is My Religion,” Ziggy Marley; “Youth,” Matisyahu; “Rhythm Doubles,” Sly and Robbie; “Who You Fighting For,” UB40.

72. Traditional World Music Album: “Music of Central Asia Vol. 2: Invisible Face of the Beloved: Classical Music of the Tajiks and Uzbeks,” the Academy of Maqam; “Endless Vision,” Hossein Alizadeh and Djivan Gasparyan; “Hambo in the Snow,” Andrea Hoag, Loretta Kelley and Charlie Pilzer; “Golden Strings of the Sarode,” Aashish Khan and Zakir Hussain; “Blessed,” Soweto Gospel Choir.

73. Contemporary World Music Album: “Tiki,” Richard Bona; “M’Bemba,” Salif Keita; “Wonder Wheel,” the Klezmatics; “Long Walk to Freedom,” Ladysmith Black Mambazo; “Savane,” Ali Farka Toure.

74. Polka Album: “Batteries Not Included,” Eddie Blazonczyk’s Versatones; “As Sweet As Candy,” Lenny Gomulka and Chicago Push; “Party Dress,” LynnMarie and the Boxhounds; “Good Friends Good Music,” Walter Ostanek and Fred Ziwich; “Polka in Paradise,” Jimmy Sturr and His Orchestra.

75. Musical Album for Children: “Baby Einstein Meet the Orchestra,” Various Artists; “Beethoven’s Wig 3: Many More Sing Along Symphonies,” Beethoven’s Wig; “Catch That Train!,” Dan Zanes and Friends; “My Best Day,” Trout Fishing in America; “The Sunny Side of the Street,” John Lithgow.

76. Spoken Word Album for Children: “Blah Blah Blah: Stories About Clams, Swamp Monsters, Pirates and Dogs,” Bill Harley; “Christmas in the Trenches,” John McCutcheon; “Disney’s Little Einsteins Musical Missions,” Various Artists; “Peter Pan,” Jim Dale; “The Witches,” Lynn Redgrave.

77. Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Story Telling): “I Shouldn’t Even Be Doing This! (Bob Newhart),” Bob Newhart; “New Rules — Polite Musings From a Timid Observer,” Bill Maher; “Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis (Jimmy Carter),” Jimmy Carter; “The Truth (With Jokes) (Al Franken),” Al Franken; “With Ossie and Ruby: In This Life Together (Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee),” Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee.

78. Comedy Album: “Blue Collar Comedy Tour — One for the Road,” Bill Engvall, Ron White, Jeff Foxworthy and Larry the Cable Guy; “The Carnegie Hall Performance,” Lewis Black; “Life Is Worth Losing,” George Carlin; “Straight Outta Lynwood,” “Weird Al” Yankovic; “You Can’t Fix Stupid,” Ron White.

79. Musical Show Album: “The Color Purple,”; “The Drowsy Chaperone,”; “Jersey Boys,”; “The Pajama Game,”; “Sweeney Todd — the Demon Barber of Fleet Street.”

80. Compilation Soundtrack Album for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media: “Brokeback Mountain,” Various Artists; “Cars,” Various Artists; “Grey’s Anatomy — Volume 2,” Various Artists; “Little Miss Sunshine,” Various Artists; “Walk the Line,” Joaquin Phoenix and Various Artists.

81. Score Soundtrack Album for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media: “The Chronicles of Narnia — the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” Harry Gregson-Williams, composer; “The Da Vinci Code,” Hans Zimmer, composer; “Memoirs of a Geisha,” John Williams, composer; “Munich,” John Williams, composer; “Pirates of the Caribbean — Dead Man’s Chest,” Hans Zimmer, composer.

82. Song Written for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media: “Can’t Take It In (From the Chronicles of Narnia — the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe),” Imogen Heap (Imogen Heap); “I Need to Wake Up (From an Inconvenient Truth),” Melissa Etheridge (Melissa Etheridge); “Our Town (From Cars),” Randy Newman (James Taylor); “There’s Nothing Like a Show on Broadway (From the Producers),” Mel Brooks (Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick); “Travelin’ Thru (From Transamerica),” Dolly Parton (Dolly Parton).

83. Instrumental Composition: “Argument,” Taylor Eigsti, composer (Taylor Eigsti), from “Lucky to Be Me”; “A Concerto in Swing,” Patrick Williams, composer (The Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra and Big Band), from “Elevation”; “A Prayer for Peace,” John Williams, composer (John Williams), from “Munich — Soundtrack”; “Sayuri’s Theme and End Credits,” John Williams, composer (John Williams, Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman), from “Memoirs of a Geisha — Soundtrack”; “Valentine,” Fred Hersch, composer (Fred Hersch), from “In Amsterdam: Live at the Bimhuis”.

84. Instrumental Arrangement: “Attack of the Killer Tomatoes,” Gordon Goodwin, arranger (Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band), from “The Phat Pack”; “Three Ghouls,” Chick Corea, arranger (Chick Corea), from “The Ultimate Adventure”; “Three Women,” Gil Goldstein, arranger (Gil Goldstein), from “Under Rousseau’s Moon”; “Tom and Eddie,” Patrick Williams, arranger (The Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra and Big Band), from “Elevation”; “Up From the Skies,” Jim McNeely, arranger (The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra), from “Up From the Skies — Music of Jim McNeely”.

85. Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s): “For Once in My Life,” Jorge Calandrelli, arranger (Tony Bennett and Stevie Wonder), from “Duets: an American Classic”; “Good Morning Heartache,” Gil Goldstein and Greg Phillinganes, arrangers (Chris Botti and Jill Scott), from “To Love Again – the Duets”; “My Flame Burns Blue (Blood Count),” Vince Mendoza, arranger (Elvis Costello With the Metropole Orkest), from “My Flame Burns Blue”; “Stardust,” Slide Hampton, arranger (Dizzy Gillespie All-Star Big Band), from “Dizzy’s Business”; “Suninga,” Gil Goldstein, arranger (Gil Goldstein), from “Under Rousseau’s Moon.”

86. Recording Package: “The Best Worst-Case Scenario,” Ryan Clark, art director (Fair); “Personal File,” Randall Martin, art director (Johnny Cash); “Reprieve,” Ani DiFranco and Brian Grunert, art directors (Ani DiFranco); “10,000 Days,” Adam Jones, art director (Tool); “Versions,” Neal Ashby and Matthew Curry, art directors (Thievery Corporation).

87. Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package: “The Cellar Door Sessions 1970,” Howard Fritzson, Dan Ichimoto and Seth Rothstein, art directors (Miles Davis); “Fonotone Records,” Susan Archie and Henry Owings, art directors (Various Artists); “A Life Less Lived — the Gothic Box,” Hugh Brown and Jean Krikorian, art directors (Various Artists); “One Kiss Can Lead to Another: Girl Group Sounds Lost and Found,” Hugh Brown, Sheryl Farber and Maria Villar, art directors (Various Artists); “Stadium Arcadium,” Flea, John Frusciante, Anthony Kiedis, Chad Smith and Matt Taylor, art directors (Red Hot Chili Peppers).

88. Album Notes: “Good for What Ails You: Music of the Medicine Shows, 1926-1937,” Marshall Wyatt, album notes writer (Various Artists); “If You Got to Ask, You Ain’t Got It!,” Dan Morgenstern, album notes writer (Fats Waller); “Lost Sounds: Blacks and the Birth of the Recording Industry 1891-1922,” Tim Brooks, album notes writer (Various Artists); “Pirate Radio,” Ben Edmonds, album notes writer (Pretenders); “There Is a Season,” David Fricke, album notes writer (The Byrds).

89. Historical Album: “Good for What Ails You: Music of the Medicine Shows, 1926-1937,”; “Lost Sounds: Blacks and the Birth of the Recording Industry 1891-1922,”; “One Kiss Can Lead to Another: Girl Group Sounds Lost and Found,”; “Poetry on Record: 98 Poets Read Their Work (1888-2006),”; “Rockin’ Bones: 1950’s Punk and Rockabilly.”

90. Engineered Album, Non-Classical: “Adieu False Heart,” Gary Paczosa, engineer (Linda Ronstadt and Ann Savoy); “At War With the Mystics,” the Flaming Lips and Dave Fridmann, engineers (The Flaming Lips); “Like Red on a Rose,” Brandon Bell, Terry Christian and Gary Paczosa, engineers (Alan Jackson); “The Phat Pack,” Marcelo Penell, Dave Sharenow and Tommy Vicari, engineers (Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band); “Suitcase,” Rik Pekkonen and John Porter, engineers (Keb’ Mo’).

91. Producer of the Year, Non-Classical: Howard Benson; T Bone Burnett; Danger Mouse; Rick Rubin; Will.i.am;.

92. Remixed Recording, Non-Classical: “Be Without You (Moto Blanco Vocal Mix),” Moto Blanco, remixer (Mary J. Blige); “Damage Thorn (Buick Project Remix),” Buick Project, remixers (Tiefschwarz and Tracey Thorn); “Deja Vu (Freemasons Club Mix — No Rap),” Russell Small and James Wiltshire, remixers (Beyonce); “Talk (Thin White Duke Mix),” Jacques Lu Cont, remixer (Coldplay); “World Hold on (E-Smoove Remix),” E-Smoove, remixer (Bob Sinclair).

93. Surround Sound Album: “Immortal Nystedt,” Morten Lindberg; “Long Walk to Freedom,” Martin Walters, surround mastering; “Morph the Cat,” Darcy Proper, surround mastering; “Straight Outta Lynwood,” Bernie Grundman, surround mastering engineer; “A Valid Path,” Bob Michaels, surround.

94. Engineered Album, Classical: “Elgar: Enigma Variations; Britten: the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra, Four Sea Interludes,” Michael Bishop, engineer (Paavo Jarvi and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra); “Latigo,” Leslie Ann Jones, engineer (Quartet San Francisco); “Mahler: Symphony No. 2,” Wolf-Dieter Karwatky and Rainer Maillard, engineers (Pierre Boulez, Wiener Philharmoniker, Christine Schafer, Michelle DeYoung & Wiener Singverein; “Requiem,” John Newton, engineer (Craig Hella Johnson and Conspirare); “Vaughan Williams: Mass in G Min., and Other a Cappella Works,” Jack Renner, engineer (Norman Mackenzie and Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chamber Chorus).

95. Producer of the Year, Classical: Manfred Eicher; Kjellemyr; Stephen Johns; James Mallinson; Elaine Martone; Sid McLauchlan.

96. Classical Album: “Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 1-9,” Bernard Haitink, conductor, James Mallinson producer (London Symphony Orchestra); Lieberson: Rilke Songs, the Six Realms, Horn Concerto,” David Starobin, producer (the Odense Symphony Orchestra); “Mahler: Symphony No. 7,” Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor, Andreas Neubronner, producer (San Francisco Symphony; “Martha Argerich and Friends: Live From the Lugano Festival 2005,” Martha Argerich and Friends, Ulrich Ruscher, producer; “Mozart: La Clemenza Di Tito,” Rene Jacobs, conductor, Marie-Claude Chappuis, Bernarda Fink, Sergio Foresti, Sunhai Im, Mark Padmore and Alexandrina Pendatchanska, Martin Sauer, producer (Freiburger Barockorchester)

97. Orchestral Performance: “Bax: Tone Poems,” Vernon Handley, conductor (BBC Philharmonic); “Glazunov: Symphonies 4 and 7,” Jose Serebrier, conductor (Royal Scottish National Orchestra); “Mahler: Symphony No. 6 in a Min.,” Ivan Fischer, conductor (Budapest Festival Orchestra); “Mahler: Symphony No. 7,” Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony); “Prokofiev: the Complete Symphonies,” Valery Gergiev, conductor (London Symphony Orchestra).

98. Opera Recording: “Bennett: the Mines of Sulphur,” Stewart Robertson, conductor (Glimmerglass Opera Orchestra); “Golijov: Ainadamar: Fountain of Tears,” Robert Spano, conductor, Kelley O’Connor and Dawn Upshaw; Valerie Gross and Sid McLauchlan, producers (Women of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra); “Mozart: La Clemenza Di Tito,” Rene Jacobs, conductor, Marie-Claude Chappuis, Bernarda Fink, Sergio Foresti, Sunhae Im, Mark Padmore and Alexandrino Pendatchanska, Martin Sauer, producer (RIAS Kammerchor, Freiburger Barockorchester); “Smetana: the Bartered Bride,” Sir Charles Mackerras, conductor, Yvette Bonner, Paul Charles Clarke, Neal Davies, Susan Gritton, Kit Hesketh-Harvey, Yvonne Howard, Robin Leggate, Diana Montague, Geoffrey Moses, Timothy Robinson and Peter Rose, Brian Couzens, producer (The Royal Opera Chorus, Philharmonia Orchestra); “Verdi: La Traviata,” Carlo Rizzi, conductor; Thomas Hampson, Anna Netrebko and Rolando Villazon; Rainer Maillard, producer (Konzertvereinigung wiener staatsopernchor, Wiener Philharmoniker.

99. Choral Performance: “Immortal Nystedt,” Oystein Fevang, conductor (Baerum Vokalensemble and Ensemble 96); “Mozart: Great Mass in C Min.,” Paul McCreesh, conductor (Sarah Connolly, Neal Davies, Timothy Robinson & Camilla Tilling, Grabieli Consort & Players); “Part: Da Pacem,” Paul Hillier, conductor (Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir); “Requiem,” Craig Hella Johnson, conductor (Conspirare); “Whitacre: Cloudburst and Other Choral Works,” Stephen Layton, conductor (Thomas Guthrie, Elin Manahan Thomas and Simon Wall), ‘Polyphony).

100. Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with Orchestra): “Brahms: the Piano Concertos,” Riccardo Chailly, conductor; Nelson Freire (Gewandhausorchester); “Henze: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 and 3,” Christopher Lyndon-Gee, conductor; Peter Sheppard Skaerved (Saarbrocken Radio Symphony Orchestra); “Messiaen: Oiseaux Exotiques (Exotic Birds),” John McLaughlin Williams, conductor; Angelin Chang (Cleveland Chamber Symphony); “Rachmaninov: Piano Concertos 1 and 2,” Antonio Pappano, conductor; Leif Ove Andsnes (Berliner Philharmoniker); “Schmidt: Concertos,” Ole Schmidt, conductor; Ulla Miilmann (Danish National Symphony Orchestra).

101. Instrumental Soloist Performance (without Orchestra): “Bach: the Sonatas and Partitas for Violin Solo,” Gidon Kremer; “Bacheler: the Bachelar’s Delight,” Paul O’Dette; “Beethoven: the Piano Sonatas, Vol. II,” Andras Schiff; “Chopin: Nocturnes,” Maurizio Pollini; “Primrose: Viola Transcriptions,” Roberto Diaz (Robert Koenig).

102. Chamber Music Performance: “Chamber Works for Winds and Strings by Mozart,” the Chicago Chamber Musicians; “Corigliano: Violin Sonata, Etude Fantasy,” Andrew Russo (Corey Cerovsek and Steven Heyman); “Intimate Voices,” Emerson String Quartet; “Martha Argerich and Friends: Live From the Lugano Festival 2005,” Martha Argerich and Friends; “Shostakovich: Piano Trios 1 and 2, Seven Romances on Verses by Alexander Blok,” Beaux Arts Trio.

103. Small Ensemble Performance: “Angel Dances,” 12 Cellists of Berliner Philharmoniker; “Ikon,” The Sixteen; “Miguel De Cervantes — Don Quijote De La Mancha — Romances Y Mosicas,” Hesperion XXI and La Capella Reial De Catalunya; “Padilla: Sun of Justice,” Peter Rutenberg, conductor (Los Angeles Chamber Singers’ Cappella); “Shostakovich/Sviridov/Vainberg: Chamber Symphonies,” Yuri Bahmet (Moscow Soloists).

104. Classical Vocal Performance: “Britten: Song Cycles,” Ian Bostridge (Sir Simon Rattle, Radek Baborak, Berliner Philharmoniker); “Canciones Argentinas,” Bernarda Fink and Marcos Fink (Carmen Piazzini); “Consider, My Soul,” Thomas Quasthoff (Sebastian Weigle, Staatskapelle Dresden); “Rilke Songs,” Lorraine Hunt Lieberson (Peter Serkin), track from Lieberson: Rilke Songs, The Six Realms, Horn Concerto; “Songs of Amy Beach,” Patrick Mason (Joanne Polk).

105. Classical Contemporary Composition: “Boston Concerto,” Elliott Carter (Oliver Knussen); “Golijov: Ainadamar: Fountain of Tears,” Osvaldo Golijov (Robert Spano); “The Here and Now,” Christopher Theofanidis (Robert Spano); “Paul Revere’s Ride,” David Del Tredici (Robert Spano); “A Scotch Bestiary,” James MacMillan (James MacMillan).

106. Classical Crossover Album: “The Film Music of Erich Wolfgang Korngold,” Rumon Gamba, conductor (BBC Philharmonic); “Invention and Alchemy,” David Lockington, conductor; Deborah Henson-Conant (The Grand Rapids Symphony); “Latigo,” Quartet San Francisco (John Santos); “Simple Gifts,” Bryn Terfel (London Voices; London Symphony Orchestra); “Song Zu Ying: the Diva Goes to the Movies,” Song Zu Ying (China National Symphony Orchestra).

107. Short Form Music Video: “8th of November,” Big and Rich; “When You Were Young,” The Killers; “Here It Goes Again,” OK Go; “Dani California,” Red Hot Chili Peppers; “Writing on the Walls,” Underoath.

108. Long Form Music Video: “Flow: Living in the Stream of Music,” Terence Blanchard; “Directions,” Death Cab for Cutie; “Demon Days — Live in Manchester,” Gorillaz; “I’m Going to Tell You a Secret,” Madonna; “Wings for Wheels: The Making of Born to Run,” Bruce Springsteen.

Published in: on December 7, 2007 at 3:23 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Grammy Nominations Are In

ET has the latest music news…

KANYE WEST leads the way in Grammy nominations, earning eight, including one for Album of the Year for his hit disc Graduation. AMY WINEHOUSE comes in a close second with six nods, going up against West in the Album of the Year category for her hit Back to Black. The troubled singer was also honored with Record and Song of the Year noms for her catchy tune “Rehab.” JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE‘s “What Goes Around Comes Around” was honored for Record of the Year — just one of the singer’s five noms.

Justin’s fellow Record of the Year nominees include BEYONCÉ‘s “Irreplaceable,” RIHANNA‘s “Umbrella” and the FOO FIGHTERS‘ “Pretender.” The rockers were also honored with an Album of the Year nomination for Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace.

Meanwhile, Best New Artist nominations went to Winehouse, FEIST, PARAMOUR, LEDESI and country star TAYLOR SWIFT.

AKON, FERGIE, VINCE GILL, LINKIN PARK, GEORGE LOPEZ and Swift announced the nominations this morning in Hollywood.

The 50th Annual Grammy Awards happens in Los Angeles on February 10, airing live on CBS.

Posted December 06, 2007 8:50:00 AM

Published in: on December 7, 2007 at 3:21 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Rihanna’s success a stepping stone for others

Rihanna’s success a stepping stone for others

I WRITE THIS LETTER in response to what I found was a very biased and distasteful letter in this section of your November 16 edition by Etta Best. It is also especially for writers in general who unjustly criticise and downplay the contribution and successful accomplishments of internationally acclaimed Barbadian singer Rihanna.

I’m a young Barbadian, under the age of 25. I have lived here all my life and must say that it didn’t surprise me in the least to read such verbiage; but at the same time I was still very disappointed to see how we as fellow Barbadians continue to blatantly bad-mouth and cry down each other, especially when we should be otherwise supportive.

It doesn’t take for one to be a Rihanna fan or even a show business personality enthusiast, to use your words, Ms Best, to support and appreciate what Rihanna has accomplished and continues to in so short a period of time and at the highest level.

Every time her face appears in a magazine or in any of the media for that matter, that is automatic marketing for Barbados that many people hardly know exist.

It is quite true that she may not be the first person to bring recognition to Barbados in the music arena, but I do believe that she is the first to make it at this highest level in the industry. Whether we may say that she is where she is now, through by no fault of her own or that she was just lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time, there is no denying that she is showing us that she can rub shoulders with the best.

I also find it to be a very fickle point to compare Rihanna to the likes of other singing entertainers and draw a comparison of their achievements, especially when the names called were persons that have been in the industry for at least a decade.

She hasn’t even rounded the three-year mark properly yet. So please gather sensible facts before putting such an argument. Even if one isn’t necessarily a fan or a supporter of her music, one doesn’t have to think too far outside the box to realise that Rihanna’s success encourages young people and those of all ages to pursue their dreams no matter the discouragement.

Remember just about three years and some ago, Robyn Fenty was probably just as ordinary as any other Bajan teenager, happy go lucky and enjoying life with just dreams on her side and then . . .well, I guess I need say no more.

It just shows that no matter where you’re from, it just takes enough luck and the right timing and placement for one to be given a chance, that’s all it really takes. Why don’t we realise that we’re as good as anyone else and stop being so small minded?

But even as Rihanna continues to do well, I pray that she remains grounded as much as possible and not get carried away to the point of no return; that she stays morally sound, decent and most of all remembering that there’s a bigger power always watching over and to give thanks for where she is today.

– JOSEPH VOLNEY

{source:http://www.nationnews.com/editorial/348839890170992.php}

Published in: on December 7, 2007 at 3:19 pm  Leave a Comment  
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